The Liar’s Bench at The Angler’s Nook, Shushan, New York

Don Bastian:

“The Liar’s Bench” post was written almost two years ago, and it is still continuing to grow. In the last two days, I received two lengthy and well-written e-mails from a man in New Jersey named George Nimmo. Mr. Nimmo fished this area for years, and he has proven at once to be an excellent writer, moreover he is a valuable and bountiful source of additional, detailed information on the characters, the original fly shop owned by Ralph Entwhistle, and the history of The Angler’s Nook – a combination fly shop / campground / hangout / diner.

One of the most interesting bits of information on this whole story comes from Kevin Laughton, who lives in Australia and, through this blog article, discovered this topic. An Australian connection? Amazing but true. Mr. Laughton and others took several hundred US soldiers on active duty in Viet Nam fishing in Australia on R&R in 1970. One of the fellows Kevin hosted was none other than Richard Entwhistle, the son of The Angler’s Nook original owner, Ralph Entwhistle.

With a few more e-mails that I’ve saved, Mr. Nimmo’s expansive information, and a photo of Richard Entwhistle in Kevin Laughton’s kitchen in 1970 in Australia with some nice trout…yes, this will one day be a largely expanded article on The Angler’s Nook and The Liar’s Bench.

Please make sure you read through the entire list of comments. It is well worth it.

Originally posted on Don Bastian Wet Flies:

I received a fly order through http://www.myflies.com from a customer in Delaware last month. Our back-and-forth e-mail correspondence eventually turned his initial dozen-and-a-half order for my Floating Caddis / Mayfly Emerger into a very nice order, as he kept adding more patterns until his order reached ten dozen, including some sulfur Comparaduns and Thorax Duns, and a few dozen of a pattern by Jim Slattery, originator of the Stimulator, called the Triple Threat Caddis. Here’s a link to Fly Angler’s On Line (FAOL) with that pattern: http://www.flyanglersonline.com/flytying/fotw2/091304fotw.php

The TTC, as I call it, while I’ve never fished it, looks like a great pattern. I’m definitely going to tie some up for my personal fly box. And I had fun tying it. I did them for my customer in tan with orange thread as the FAOL article suggests, a ginger-brown version, and olive. Anyway, to The Liar’s Bench at the Angler’s…

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Ontario In March – Fly Tying Classes and Demos

Everything is official now. I am heading to Ontario on Thursday, March 12, and presenting a fly tying class that evening at Grand River Outfitting and Fly Shop in Fergus from 6 – 9 PM. Here is the information posted on the event on the Grand River Outfitting and Fly Shop website:

www.http://ontarioflyfishing.ca/event/gro-presents-don-bastian-grand-river-caddis-patterns/

The class will feature all of my original caddis patterns: The Hatching Caddis Adult, Hatching Caddis Pupa, Floating Caddis / Mayfly Emerger, Floating Caddis Pupa, plus two more proven and deadly caddis larva patterns. These flies, if you have them in your box, will certify your readiness for most any caddis hatch / situation you encounter. Just have a range of sizes and colors… ;-)  And here is a link to the shop: www.http://ontarioflyfishing.ca/

Mary and I will be meeting part-time shop employee, guide, instructor, and good friend, John Hoffmann for a relaxing afternoon and dinner before the class.

Friday evening, March 13, I am presenting a fly tying class at First Cast Fly Shop in Guelph, from 6 to 9:30 PM.

Here is a link to the event at First Cast:  http://www.thefirstcast.ca/event/don-bastian/

Rates and reservation information is now posted for both shop classes. The Niagara Region Flytyers Event has a few remaining tickets for sale to the public, at $20 each.

Saturday March 14, I am presenting a fly tying demo in St. Catherines, for the Niagara Region Flytyers Club, to be video -played on a TV screen, time of this demo is from 11 AM to 4 PM. There will be a couple breaks in this five-hour session. One highlight of the classes and demo will be the tying of Bastian’s Floating Caddis / Mayfly Emerger. Specific information about the patterns in these sessions can be obtained from the fly shops. As yet I am not certain that the event in St. Catherines is open to the public.

Bastian's Floating Caddis Emerger.

Bastian’s Floating Caddis Emerger. This pattern and its variations will be part of these sessions. This fly is deadly. One of my customers posted on the Orvis site, “it should be illegal.” ;-)

During and after these classes, Mary and I will be hanging out as the guest of my close friend Rick Whorwood, who resides in Stoney Creek, Ontario, a suburb of Hamilton. We have been close friends for twenty-five years. Rick is a fellow musician of sorts; he has “some guitars” and recently bought a vintage 1967-ish Rogers Drum set, champagne sparkle pearl. He started taking drum lessons recently and while he is learning fast – he used to drum back in his teenaged years – he wants me to show him some of my chops. ;-) Mary plays guitar as well, and she’s a heck of a good singer, so I think the two of them might be doing a little jamming. Maybe even the three of us…

My vintage 1975 English-made Premier Powerhouse 2500 drum set...prior to the start of a local gig.

My vintage 1975 English-made Premier Powerhouse 2500 drum set…prior to the start of a local gig.

This is going to be a great trip! Anyone interested in these classes, please feel free to let me know in the comment section.

Recycled Fish

Yes, indeed. A fish made from recycled materials. Who’d have thought this up? But apparently two women artists from western Pennsylvania did, and made this “beast.”

One of my blog followers and friends who lives in the area near Pittsburgh, saw this in a local recycling center and took the photo. In this shop, they also have almost anything and just about everything for sale, including used furniture, doors, car parts, etc.

Recycled Fish. I'm not sure if this creation actually has a name...

Recycled Fish. I’m not sure if this creation actually has a name…photo by Bill Havrilla.

It measures sixteen feet long and weighs 1500 pounds. The two women who built it made it entirely from trash and junk collected along the Allegheny River and donated it to the center. It has at least three bicycle forks (on this side) in the dorsal fin and two more in the caudal fin. The mouth is made of a couple front quarter-panels from a car, and various bits and pieces. The eyes on both sides, are car headlights. The fins are all made of bundles of electrical wiring in among the bicycle forks.

Oh, and it’s not for sale…in case you were wondering.

Online Soft-Hackle Pattern Book

Waterhen and Red Soft-hackle. Photo from Neil Norman's blog.

Waterhen and Red Soft-hackle. Photo from Neil Norman’s blog.

A fellow named Neil Norman sent me a message a couple weeks ago that he had linked his blog to mine. Finally I had time to check it out. I borrowed the image above from his most recent post.

Since I have lots of readers interested in Soft-hackles here, I though I would share this news. I have linked his blog, a Soft-hackle Pattern Book:

http://softhacklepatternbook.blogspot.com/  to mine. The link is listed on the right, here, under “Blog Links” or something like that. You can click from here and get there anytime. ;-) Or better yet, if you like soft-hackles and what you see there, then subscribe and you’ll get e-mail notice of each post he makes.

Mr. Norman is a PhD candidate for English Literature. Dare I say, he writes well, and intelligently. Check it out!

Status Report and Calendar of Events

This short post is an announcement of several things. First, this is post no. 400, since March of 2010 when I started this blog. I presently have 868 followers. (now up to 895 – 2-19-2015). A good many of them signed on in the last ten days when there was some drama aka “lively discussion” here. That has been cleaned up since then, and for good reason. To that, I will only say, sometimes good guys do win. ;-)

Secondly, during this time, I had my highest ever number of visits, 894 on January 29th. And I received a lot of support, nearly 100% in fact, from people who commented, people who did not comment but e-mailed me, and / or voiced their support to me in person at the Somerset, New Jersey, Fly Fishing Show.

I have some events coming up. Here is my planned itinerary for the next few months:

Thursday March 12: Fly Tying Class at Grand River Outfitting and Fly Shop in Fergus, Ontario, 6 – 9 PM.

Friday March 13: Fly Tying Class at First Cast Fly Shop In Guelph, Ontario, 6 – 9:30 PM.

Saturday March 14: 5-hour fly tying demo, with camera and large screen at The Niagara Region Flytyers Club in St. Catherine’s, Ontario. 11 – 4 PM. Some tickets are available to the general public, at $20.

I will not be at the Lancaster Fly Fishing Show; I was thinking about it, but the band got booked at a Mardi-Gras event in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, so I’m staying in town to have fun.

Monday April 6: Federation of Flyfishers Club, fly tying demo and program on Soft-hackle Wet Flies. Big Flats, New York.

Saturday April 11: Catskill Fly Tyers Guild Annual Fly Tyers Rendezvous, at the Catskill Fly Fishing Center and Museum, Livingston Manor, New York. Here is the link to “Events” on their page:

http://catskillflytyersguild.org/events.html

Monday May 11: On-the-Fly, Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania. An all-day event.

http://donbastianwetflies.com/2013/05/12/on-the-fly-spruce-creek-pennsylvania/

There is another event in the planning stages that will be in Maine. I have been invited to participate in this. It will be the last weekend in June in the Rangeley Region. I am honored to be invited; that is all I can say about it for now. As soon as I receive information it will be posted here.

When I get details on the classes in Canada I will post them.

Life indeed moves on. I am excited about this 400th post. It is short, but continuing on, I shall try to make future posts worthwhile, as in entertaining, informative, helpful, and interesting. When my book, “Favorite Fishing Flies – 1892″ on the 1800’s Orvis flies is accepted by a publisher – soon – you will all be the first to know. Thank you everyone for your support! Things have a way of happening as they are supposed to…

Bastian’s Floating Sulphur Emerger – Part II

Don Bastian:

After today’s post on my Floating Caddis-Mayfly Emerger I received two requests for tying steps to make this fly. So reblogging this original post; here they are, from my article dated May of 2013. Lots of fishing pics, info on the day, tactical stuff, etc. Note to interested tiers: Both the Orvis version with the wound hackle collar, and the MyFlies.com version with side-lashed legs are here. See the notes on that below the MyFlies.com Hi-Vis Emerger.

Originally posted on Don Bastian Wet Flies:

This article is Part II of the Floating Sulphur Emerger pattern. This season on Spring Creek, using my Floating Caddis – “Sulphur” Emerger, I decided to try something new and different; that is; fishing with two dry flies at the same time, in a tandem dry fly rig. I had done that successfully out west in 2006 on the Madison, using my Floating Caddis Emerger trailed on 5x tippet behind a #10 Grizzly Wulff as an indicator fly. I did this so I could see the Emerger on the broken water, plus to provide better visibility and improved tracking of the smaller, flush-floating emerger at distances of forty to fifty-five feet that I was occasionally casting.

On Spring Creek this season, this is the data and fishing report from four trips made on the following dates: May 10th, 17th, 24th, and 30th. Each time I fished there I used two…

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Bastian’s Floating Caddis / Mayfly Emerger

I had announced this on my facebook page last week, but I also wanted to post something here. I am pleased to announce that the Orvis Company has picked up for the third year, my original pattern, “Bastian’s Floating Cadddis Emerger.” It is offered in their online catalog:

http://www.orvis.com/store/product_search_tnail.aspx?keyword=bastian%27s+floating+caddis+emerger

This pattern was created in 2006, a revised fly that began in 1996 with my original Hatching Caddis Adult pattern. It has been field-tested in Pennsylvania; on Penn’s Creek, Big Pine Creek, and Spring Creek. I also used it successfully on the Beaverkill in New York, and Montana’s Madison River, and my brother has used it on Maine’s Penobscot River for land-locked salmon. It has also proven itself as a very effective still-water fly. Since its release with Orvis, a customer and his wife from Massachusetts, who guide with the 2014 Orvis Guide of the Year, Tim Linehan, used it on the Missouri River in 2013 and hammered ‘em. Tim had not seen the pattern previously and was surprised by its success. He bought some from me afterward.

Here is a photo of Susan Ukena with Tim Linehan, and a fine Missouri River rainbow that took my emerger – a #14 tan:

Sue Ukena and Orvis 2014 Guide of the Year, Tim Linehan, with a Missouri River rainbow that fell to Bastian's Floating Caddis Emerger.

Sue Ukena and Orvis 2014 Guide of the Year, Tim Linehan, with a Missouri River rainbow that fell to Bastian’s Floating Caddis Emerger.

I also wanted to get the fly on the MyFlies.com site, but could not in good conscience place the same pattern there. So I made two changes in the pattern, number one, the way the hackle is applied. On the MyFlies.com version, Bastian’s Floating Caddis / Mayfly Emerger, I side-lash the legs. And number two, I added a chartreuse foam indicator to the top of the fly and the neck, between the body and head section. This helps improve visibility of the fly, which rides on the surface. It is called an emerger, but this fly is actually a dry fly, even though it is unconventional in its appearance as a dry fly. Another thing about it, even if swamped by surface turbulence, it remains in the film. That is why the hi-vis indicator is helpful. Plus I have successfully for the last three seasons, doubled-up and used a tandem dry fly rig with this pattern; a sulfur dun and a ginger colored “sulfur” version of Bastian’s Floating Caddis / Mayfly Emerger. The larger, high-floating, more visible dun pattern keeps your eye tracking the drift of the emerger as well. Trout flash, swirl, boil, or just show themselves under the dun, and they are generally always looking at, or most times, have taken the emerger. This is why I have trained myself to be quick to strike at any sign of a trout. Even with just 10″ of tippet between the dun and emerger, the dry fly does not always give indication that the trout took the emerger. They are faster and quicker on the “take and spit” than most of us ever realize.

There are about ten or eleven articles here on my blog related to this pattern. Use the search tab, type in “Floating Emerger,” hit the enter key and they will come up. Lots of photos, success stories, tactical stuff, tying instructions…it’s all there.

Here is a pic from the MyFlies.com site:

This is the gingeerr colored veersion of Bastian's Floating Caddis / Mayfly Emerger, this KILLS on Speing Creeek and any stream where the sulfurs, Ephemerella rotunda exist.

This is the ginger-colored version of Bastian’s Floating Caddis / Mayfly Emerger. This fly KILLS on Spring Creek and any stream where the sulfurs, phemerella rotunda exist.

A customer here in Pennsylvania recently ordered some of these. Here is a quote from the e-mail I got the other day when he received his order:

“Received the flies. Once again, I am just stunned at the character of these flies in person, I am not surprised they are so killer.”

These flies are available from Orvis, or from MyFlies.com. I also offer them in custom colors and sizes, I have tied them as small as #20, and as large as a #10 – 2x long in brown as a Slate Drake Emerger. Now all we have to do is wait for Spring…