Partridge and Hare’s Ear Soft-Hackle

My friend Bill Shuck in Maryland just sent me another photo and recipe of his latest fly tying efforts. It is a Pete Hidy style rendition of the Partridge and Hare’s Ear Soft-hackle wet fly / flymph.

It is taken from a recipe in the book, The Masters on the Nymph, by Migel and Wright.
Caddis “Partridge and Hare’s Ear.”
Hook: Gaelic Supreme Jack Mickievicz Letort Dry Fly Standard Shank, Size #14
Thread: Pearsall’s Gossamer, #10 Ash
Hackle: One or two turns of partridge hackle slightly longer than the hook
Ribbing: Fine gold wire
Body: Hare’s poll on ash silk thread
Head: Same as body thread
This looks like a killer pattern; simple, easy to tie, all-purpose generic food item that has wide appeal to the trout. Thanks Bill for your great tying and for the photo!
Partridge and Hare's Ear Soft-hackle Caddis / Flymph. Tied and photographed by Bill Shuck.

Partridge and Hare’s Ear Soft-hackle Caddis / Flymph. Tied and photographed by Bill Shuck.

This fly has got to be a great performer in a two or three fly rig, swung down-and-across.

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12 comments on “Partridge and Hare’s Ear Soft-Hackle

  1. Jim Ottevaere says:

    The Partridge and Hare’s Ear Soft Hackle reminded me of a series of patterns that we old Grouse hunters have tied for many years. A great early Autumn fly on our Upper Manistee River in northern Michigan. The goal was to use as much Ruffed Grouse feathers as possible in one pattern. This one, fondly called, “Grailin’ Grouse”, after one of our favorite hunting spots, is pretty much all Grouse, or as you fellows in the East call them, “Pat’ridge”.

    Tied by: Jim Ottevaere, Grayling, MI

    Tag: flat gold tinsel and dark brown silk Tail: ruffed grouse center tail slips Butt: black ostrich Body: 1/3 light brown silk, 1/3 medium brown silk, 1/3 medium brown mohair Rib: oval gold tinsel Hackle: front 1/3 light brown ruffed grouse body Throat: ruffed grouse body Wing: ruffed grouse body Sides: ruffed grouse body 2/3 of wing. Another 1/3 of wing Cheek: jungle cock nail Head: black lacquer Hook: #12 to #2

    >

    • russ howard says:

      Jim, I’m interested in purchasing some of your grouse patterned flies featured in the Ruff Grouse Society publication. Fly called the Grayling Grouse.

      • Don Bastian says:

        Hi Russ;
        I’m not sure this comment will get through to Jim Ottavaere…thanks for your interest! If he doesn’t reply here, perhaps I can give him your e-mail address…

  2. Marc Billett says:

    Very nice!

  3. Bill Shuck says:

    Hey Jim ~ I can remember ruffed grouse being called “pa’tridge” by my father-in-law in Wisconsin, and that bird does indeed have many useful feathers for tying various flies. Your pattern sounds like a beautiful example of one. However, the hackle used on this particular Hidy style flymph pattern is from the neck of a Hungarian partridge.

  4. Kelly L says:

    Killer fly there Bill!

  5. Don Bastian says:

    Thank you Jim, Marc, Bill, and Kelly for your comments and input here! It’s great sharing and enjoying these old patterns! Makes us wanna get out and fish! 🙂

  6. Mark W says:

    One of my favorites for sure and a very nice turn on the oldie but goodie. I tie it old school with orange silk, leave a tag end and then counter wrap through the hares ear dubbing instead of the gold wire. Little orange head for a hot spot and Bamb you’re done.

  7. Justin says:

    I love the hook choice! Interesting!
    The pattern itself is wonderful, I love the simplicity of its “buggyness.” A pheasent tail version would be equally fantastic.

    • Don Bastian says:

      Hi Justin;

      Thanks for your appreciation of Bill’s soft-hackle fly! How can this not be a great pattern? Soft-hackle version of one of the best flies ever! Thanks for your comment!

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