Sulphur MayflyDuns – Four-pack Selection

These four patterns were just added yesterday to MyFlies.com as part of my product page. Here is the link: http://www.myflies.com/Sulphur-Mayfly-Duns-Four-pack-Selection-P828.aspx

I have made a few recent posts about some of these sulphur dun patterns and their fishing effectiveness, both on Spring Creek, and in the article on Muddy Creek in York County, Pennsylvania. Sulphurs occur on most trout streams across the country. This Four-pack Selection of Sulphur Duns presents together; mayfly dun patterns in the following styles: Thorax Dun, Parachute Dun, Comparadun, and Quill-body Comparadun.

If you have read these previous posts you are aware that I’ve written several articles about the synthetic, elastic, and translucent material made by DuPont, but called by different names depending on the fly tying material company that sells it. For those of you who haven’t seen these posts, once more, here we go again: Sexi-Floss, Dyna-Floss, Flexi-Floss, and the former Orvis name, Super-Floss (discontinued).

Here is a product review from The Beaverkill Angler Fly Shop in Roscoe, New York:

“Flexi-Floss / Floss Flex is a crinkly spandex material that is stretchable yet handles like floss (better and easier than floss – DB). Great for ribbing, wiggly legs, antennae, segmented wrapped midge bodies, and more. Flexi-Floss / Floss Flex is easy to use and adds a little extra shine to your flies. Best of all it doesn’t break down like rubber legs, so your flies will last longer.” Here is the page to the product:

http://beaverkillangler.com/fly_tying/synthetics/flexi_floss_floss_flex.aspx

The same product, Sexi-Floss, from Montana Fly Company, is available from Chris Helm at Whitetail Fly Tieing Supplies, in Toledo, Ohio. The bonus of ordering from Chris is you speak directly to him, he is an experienced and knowledgeable fly tier, he knows fly tying materials, and he personally receives and processes your order. Here is his phone number: 419-843-2106. Chris also has some of the best deer hair available, sorted and graded for specific fly tying uses. Here is a photo of the four pattern styles; all flies are tied by me, and all photos are mine as well:

Sulphur Dun Patterns, left to right:

Sulphur Dun Patterns, left to right: Thorax Dun, Parachute Dun, Comparadun, and Quill-body Comparadun. All except the Comparadun are tied with a synthetic quill body, made of Sulphur Orange (or amber) Sexi-Floss, Flexi-Floss, etc. Notice how slim, smooth, and as A. K. Best describes mayfly bodies, “waxy looking” they are. Highly imitative and this material floats. Nice!

This collection of four sulphur dun patterns is representative of the mayfly Ephemerella invaria. The “sulphurs” are a very eagerly anticipated hatch on many streams, particularly in the Eastern US. These mayflies occur with variations in color and size. This offering of four different pattern types and hook sizes is intended to increase the anglers chances of success when fishing a sulphur hatch. Trout can be selective to pattern types, particularly on flat water so it is beneficial to the angler to have more than one style and size of dun pattern when fishing this hatch. This proven collection of Sulphur Duns helps solve the difficulties of fishing sulphur drys to finicky trout. All four duns are tied with split tails.

On the tying recipes, all materials are listed in the order that they are tied in.

Comparadun

#14 Sulphur Comparadun. This pattern uses rabbit dubbing for the body, but the abdomen is reverse-dubbed and ribbed with the tying thread. You can see how this procedure adds realism to the fly, and it also tightens up the abdomen. For a video of my Reverse-Dubbing technique, check out my March Brown Comparadun youtube video.

Sulphur Comparadun

Hook: Standard dry fly hook, #14 – #18

Thread: Danville Flymaster 6/0 #7 Orange

Wing: Bleached deer hair

Tails: Yellow Microfibetts, six fibers split 3/3

Abdomen: Amber rabbit dubbing, reverse-dubbed and ribbed with the tying thread

Thorax: Amber rabbit dubbing, more robust than the abdomen

Head: Orange

You can see that the thorax is more robust than the abdomen, this is an imitative design feature, but it  also is part of the tying process because you are building the thorax over the butt ends of the clipped deer hair wing. Because of the color variations of the Ephemerella invaria duns across their range, similar but different thread and dubbing colors can be used. Alternate threads to use would include Danville #2 Cream, #4 Pale Yellow, #8 Yellow, and #61 Light Olive.

#14 Sulphur Parachute Dun.

#14 Sulphur Parachute Dun. Note the Sexi-Floss abdomen and dubbed thorax. The parachute hackle helps the fly land right side up, and this design presents a different silhouette to the trout. In fact, while each of these patterns represents the same mayfly, each style presents a similar but different silhouette to the trout. Being prepared with multiple pattern styles can be your ace-in-the-hole when confronted with a sulphur hatch. In fact, this is true of most mayfly species.

The Sulphur Parachute Dun is made with the same abdomen of synthetic quill material as the Quill-body Comparadun, and has a dubbed thorax, but it has a poly-post wing and a parachute hackle. The advantage of parachute duns provides a highly-visible, low-floating, imitative design. It is generally considered a better dry fly pattern for fishing riffles, runs, and typically rougher pocket water than the no-hackle Comparadun.

Sulphur Parachute Dun

Hook: Standard dry fly hook, #14 – 18

Thread: Danville Flymaster 6/0 #7 Orange

Wing: Light dun polypropylene post

Hackle: Light ginger

Tails: Yellow Microfibetts

Abdomen: Sulphur orange Flexi-Floss

Thorax: Amber rabbit dubbing

Head: Orange

While I have used this material for years, I recently started using the polypropylene as a wing post, rather than the E. P. Fibers as posted on some of my recent flies. This was done for ease of use and less preparation time. More flies per hour means a raise in pay. I also found out that the crinkly nature of the polypropylene is much easier to wrap around, or post, at the base of the wing. The E. P. Fibers are very slippery, while the kinky nature of the poly yarn seems to grab and hold the thread, eliminating a point of (sometimes) fly tying exasperation. Check the photo, you can see the zig-zags in the wing material.

#14 Quill-body Sulphur Comparadun

#14 Quill-body Sulphur Comparadun. This design features the abdomen of Flexi-Sexi-Dyna Floss.

The Sulphur Quill-body Comparadun is a personal pattern design variation that has a more realistic body silhouette with a slim, waxy-smooth abdomen that contrasts with the more robust fur-dubbed thorax. The abdomen is made from a synthetic quill material that is highly translucent, and it also floats, thereby adding increased flotation to this pattern.

Sulphur Quill-body Comparadun

Hook: Standard dry fly hook #14 – #18

Thread: Danville Flymaster 6/0 #7 Orange

Wing: Bleached deer hair

Tails: Yellow Microfibetts

Abdomen: Orange Flexi-floss

Thorax: Amber rabbit dubbing

Head: Orange

#14 Sulphur Thorax Dun.

#14 Sulphur Thorax Dun. I call this the Poly-wing Thorax Dun.

The Sulphur Thorax Dun offers yet another pattern variation that helps fool trout. The wing is placed a little farther from the hook eye than the Parachute Dun, and the hackle is wound conventionally, but clipped on the bottom. Like all the patterns in this set, the Sulphur Thorax Dun features a split tail with the synthetic, translucent quill abdomen and a fur-dubbed thorax. Like each pattern in this collection, the Thorax Dun offers a different silhouette on the surface. This is an asset to the angler who is prepared with multiple fly designs for any mayfly hatch.

As far as I know, Barry Beck created the Poly-wing Thorax Dun as an alternate style of making the Marinaro Thorax Dun, a fly design using the broad, webby part of neck hackles, created by Pennsylvania author and fly tier, Vincent C. Marinaro. Through personal correspondence, Vince’s Thorax Dun debuted among the New Dry Flies, in Ray Bergman’s second edition of Trout, 1952, with this comment: “I think it to be an outstanding development in fly construction.” And Ray adds, “Mr. Marinaro tells me he is working on a book concerning this and other flies. It should prove very interesting.” Modern Fly Fly Code was published in 1950, while I happen to know that the correspondence between Ray Bergman and Vince Marinaro took place in 1948-49. Ray saved every letter, and during my research for the Ray Bergman biography I wrote for Forgotten Flies, 1999, I was privileged to meet with Ray’s niece and nephew, Norma and Buddy Christian, of Nyack, New York. Ray hand-copied every letter into his own hand, in pencil, onto a tablet not unlike those we used to get in grade school. He did that for his wife, Grace, whom I believe typed all his manuscripts. It was a honor and a privilege to have access to this material. Getting back to Barry Beck’s Poly-wing Thorax Dun, along with Jim Smethers, one of the other fly shop tiers, I used to occasionally tie the pattern for them in the early 1990’s. Any mayfly dun can be imitated with this pattern design style.

Sulphur Thorax Dun

Hook: Standard dry fly hook #14 – #18

Thread: Danville Flymaster 6/0 #7 Orange

Wing: Light dun polypropylene yarn

Tails: Yellow Mivrofibetts

Abdomen: Sulphur Orange Flexi-Floss

Hackle: Light ginger

Thorax: Amber rabbit dubbing

Head: Orange

On the hackled patterns, alternate colors of hackle would be medium ginger, and various shades of light, medium, and sandy dun. I have a beautiful bleached grizzly cape from Bill Keough that would also make some great-looking sulphur dun patterns, considering the cream and light-ginger mottled coloration.

Here are a couple Spring Creek brown trout that were fooled by these flies:

Spring Creek Brown - Sulphur

Spring Creek Brown – taken on a #14 Sulphur Parachute Dun.

Spring Creek Brown - Sulphur Thorax Dun.

Spring Creek Brown – taken on #14 Sulphur Thorax Dun.

These four patterns are also being offered together in an attractive boxed set. The set is identified with a printed label, a signature card, the flies are mounted on foam strips, and they are beautifully packaged in a clear plastic case. This attention to detail and quality of the flies in a boxed set makes this a tasteful gift. The set includes three each of the four patterns: Sulphur Comparadun, Sulphur Quill-body Comparadun,  Sulphur Parachute Dun, and Sulphur Thorax Dun. Available hook sizes are #14, #16, and #18. Individual flies are available in all three hook sizes, while the sets contain all patterns of the same hook size.

Don Bastian's Sulphur Dun Selection.

Don Bastian’s Boxed Sulphur Dun Selection.

What it imitates:  Ephmerella invaria mayfly sub-imago (dun)

When to fish it:  Depending on locale: mid-April in the southern Appalachians, late April through June in the northeastern US

Where to fish it:  Sulphurs inhabit most of the freestone and limestone creeks, streams, and rivers in the eastern and mid-western United States and Canada. They are also present in some tailwater fisheries such as the Delaware River.

How to fish it:  Sulphur dun patterns should generally be fished on 5x tippet, in some cases 6x, but only with smaller hook sizes and smooth water. My personal experience fishing sulphurs is always with 5x, using a leader of ten to fourteen feet.

Thank you for your time to visit and read my blog. To purchase these patterns or the boxed set, please visit: http://www.myflies.com/Sulphur-Mayfly-Duns-Four-pack-Selection-P828.aspx

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Sulphur Parachute Mayfly Duns

Not too long ago I posted photos and recipes for some dry fly patterns: a Sulphur Thorax Dun and Sulphur Parachute Dun. This post contains photos of the same Sulphur Parachute pattern – for review and a few different photos, but I also present another variation, a Sulphur Parachute Thorax Dun. What is the difference? The Thorax Parachute Dun pattern has the wing positioned slightly more toward the center of the hook shank, and to make it different and give my customer more options to imitate the slightly different coloration that can occur with the Sulphur or Ephemerella invaria duns, I used dubbing only on the Thorax Parachute Dun pattern, and ribbed it with the tying thread, whereas the Standard Parachute Dun has an abdomen of Sexi-Floss.

Here are some images:

#16 Sulphur Parachute Dun

#16 Sulphur Parachute Dun, tied and photographed by Don Bastian.

Sulphur Parachute Dun

Components listed in order of application to hook:

Hook: Standard dry fly hook, #14 – #18

Thread: Danville Flymaster 6/0 #7 Orange

Wing Post: E. P. Fibers in Light Dun or Tan

Hackle: Light ginger or ginger

Tails: Six fibers split 3/3 of yellow Microfibetts

Abdomen: Sulphur orange or amber (same color depending on mfg.) Sexi-Floss

Thorax: Amber, sulphur orange, or orange rabbit fur

Head: Orange

Tying Instructions:

1) Start thread on hook, lay thread base for wing placement on location 1/3 distance behind hook eye.

2) Place E. P. Fibers for wing (these need to be sized / bunched to the hook / fly size ahead of time), on hook shank and using a pinch wrap, make three or four wraps in place to lash them to the hook. Then make one wrap in front of and one wrap behind the fibers.

3) Grasp the wing fibers, pull them up (or down – see my Parachute Adams tying post), and post around the base of the fibers until the wing is gathered together.

4) Attach the hackle to the base of the wing post. Be sure to clip the barbs from the stem at the tie-in point, rather than stripping them off.

5) Wind to hook point, attach Microfibetts. See the Hendrickson / Red Quill Parachute pattern post for the method to divide these fibers. Four figure-eight wraps are used to divide the fibers after you flare them out with your left hand index finger and thumb.

6) Advance thread to thorax, attach Sexi-Floss. Stretch the Sexi-Floss and wind thread to base of tail. Return thread to thorax. Wrap the abdomen. Tie off with three – four tight wraps, trim Sexi-Floss.

7) Apply dubbing to thorax, move tying thread to back of head, not hook eye. Ideally you want to tie the hackle off slightly behind the hook eye.

8) Wind hackle counter-clockwise to avoid trapping fibers when you finish it off. Again, see the Parachute Adams and Hendrickson Parachute posts.

#16 Sulphur parachute Duns, one dozen, tied and photographed by Don Bastian.

#16 Sulphur Parachute Duns, one dozen, tied and photographed by Don Bastian. You can see that I did a half-and-half mix of the wings, using both light dun and tan E. P. Fibers. This mixes it up just a bit to help fool more trout.

#16 Sulphur Thorax Parachute Dun, tied and photographed by Don Bastian.

#16 Sulphur Thorax Parachute Dun, tied and photographed by Don Bastian. Notice the wing placement is a little closer to the hook point, in fact just about half-way between hook eye and point. Notice the abdominal ribbing, this is reverse-dubbed. See details below.

Sulphur Thorax Parachute Dun

Hook: Standard dry fly hook, #14 to #18, in this case I used a straight eye Daiichi hook

Thread: Danville 6/0 Flymaster #7 Orange

Wing: E. P Fibers in Light Dun or Tan

Hackle: Light ginger or light dun

Tail: Six Yellow Microfibetts split 3/3

Abdomen: Amber rabbit dubbing, wound over from rear to front with tying thread for ribbing

Thorax: Amber rabbit dubbing, or a slightly different color – sulphur orange or orange, could be used

Head: Orange

Tying Instructions:
1) Set the wing and hackle as in the instructions above.

2) Ditto for the tail fibers

3) Advance thread to base of wing, apply dubbing, sparingly, the goal being to wind dubbed thread to the base of the tail, and run out of dubbing exactly at the end of the body. Then merely wind the tying thread right from the bobbin, up to the base of the wing, spacing it evenly to create ribs.

4) Dub the thorax.

5) Wind the hackle counter-clockwise, lock in place with three or four thread wraps, trim off, build head and whip finish.

It is sometimes necessary to pull or clip guard hairs from the dubbing to tidy up the body. You could use Superfine Dubbing for the abdomen and rabbit for the thorax;  I chose to use rabbit fur on these flies.

One dozen #16 Sulphur Thorax Parachute Duns, tied and photographed by Don Bastian.

One dozen #16 Sulphur Thorax Parachute Duns, tied and photographed by Don Bastian. Notice the split tails. This is highly imitative and also helps to stabilize the fly on the water.

Both these pattern styles offer the option of changing hook sizes, wing, tail, hackle, and dubbing colors. Accordingly, a multitude of mayflies can be imitated with this pattern style: March Browns, Blue-wing Olives, Slate Drakes, Hendricksons, Green Drakes, Pale Morning Duns, etc.

On The Fly – Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania

On Monday May 13th, the 17th Annual On The Fly Event will be held on Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania, on the property of the Wayne Harpster family. I have been invited to participate as a guest fly tier; this will be my fifth or sixth appearance at this event. It is a great time!

On The Fly is a fund-raising event for Centre County Youth Services Bureau. Four-person teams compete by fishing on assigned beats. Various sponsors contribute to promote the event. Food is catered, a local winery and brewery make beverage contributions to help support the event.

My part is mostly spent tying flies as entertainment for the team members and volunteers during their off times. I donate flies in return for my participation. This year I am donating three dozen fishing flies and a collection of twenty Carrie Stevens streamers patterns, tied by me, presented in a Riker Mount. There is a live auction in the evening after dinner.

On The Fly sign at the Harpster covered bridge on Spruce Creek.

On The Fly sign at the Harpster covered bridge on Spruce Creek.

Breakfast and lunch are served buffet style on the covered bridge.

Breakfast and lunch are served buffet style on the covered bridge. Look at those cookies! Yum!

View of Spruce Creek looking upstream of the covered bridge.

View of Spruce Creek looking upstream of the covered bridge. The signs designate the boundaries of the fishing contest “beats.” You can see the rings on the water – it was raining.

View of Spruce Creek downstream from the covered bridge.

View of Spruce Creek downstream from the covered bridge.

From the covered bridge, a view of the main dining tent, the Harpster cabin (partially obscured), and the beer trailer at left

From the covered bridge entrance, a view of the main dining tent, the Harpster cabin (partially obscured), and the Otto’s Brew Pub beer trailer at left. Yes, it was raining off and on last year, mostly on.

Parking area. There are usually twenty or more four-person teams, plus sponsors

Parking area. There are usually twenty or more four-person teams, plus sponsors. The evening meal is probably served to close to two hundred persons.

Pennsylbvania fly fishing celebrity and author Joe Humphreys shares a laugh with some contestants.

Pennsylvania fly fishing celebrity and author Joe Humphreys, right, shares a laugh with contestants.

On-The-Fly May 2012 009Contestants prepare for the first afternoon beat.

The beer trailer was a popular spot.

The beer trailer was a popular spot.

View downstream prior to the first afternoon beat.

Above the covered bridge, view downstream prior to the first afternoon beat.

The covered bridge.

The covered bridge. This is a really peaceful, tranquil location.

View opf lunch buffet af6ter most of the crowd had passed through.

View of the lunch buffet after most of the crowd had passed through. Note the electric fan light combinations. This is a deluxe model of a covered bridge.

My good friend, Paul Rebarchak, was a contestant last year. Here he is concentrating on his drift while nymph fishing.

My good friend, Paul Rebarchak, of Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, was a contestant last year. Here he is concentrating on his drift while nymph fishing. The person to his rear is the controller – they measure and record the trout for point scoring, and also ensure rules are followed. If you lose your fly, you are finished fishing that beat. Large fish can be encountered, five or more pounds, so most contestants use heavy (2x or 3x) tippets.

The ever-popular beer trailer.

The ever-popular beer trailer. “What’ll it be, ladies?”

The main tent - table settings for dinner.

The main tent – table settings ready for dinner.

Some of my Carrie Stevens streamer patterns displayed in Riker Mounts.

Some of my Carrie Stevens streamer patterns displayed in Riker Mounts.

#14 Sulphur Parachute Duns and spinners that I tied during the day last year. The abdomens are made from the suklphur orange Super Floss. I'll be posting these flies separately - soon - with recipes.

#14 Sulphur Parachute Duns and spinners that I tied during the day last year. The abdomens are made from sulphur orange Flexi-Floss. (Which I found out from the Orvis Rep, Doug Baer, is no longer an Orvis product). The Super Floss, Dyna-Floss, Flexi-Floss, Sexi-Floss, Floss-Flex, etc., topic was discussed on another post here: https://donbastianwetflies.com/2012/04/30/march-brown-spinners/ I’ll be posting these flies separately – soon – with recipes.

The beer trailer - still drawing a crowd.

The beer trailer – still drawing a crowd.

Appetizers - grilled lamb chops...

Appetizers – grilled lamb chops…

...buffalo shrimp...

…buffalo shrimp…

...and stuffed mushrooms. Served by friendly, roaming wait-staff.

…and stuffed mushrooms. There were other appetizers I did not get photos of. Served by friendly, roaming wait-staff.

Lamb chops sizzle on the grill.

Lamb chops sizzle on the grill. Am I making you hungry?

Chef's from the caterer - Otto's Brew Pub in State College - tending the grills.

Chef’s from the caterer – “Catering With Style – Otto’s Brew Pub in State College – tending the outdoor kitchen. http://ottospubandbrewery.com/

View of the Harpster cabin.

View of the Harpster cabin. A waitress carries a plate of appetizers.

Seven Mountains Winery provided a very nice Riesling...

Seven Mountains Winery provided a very nice Riesling…

...and a Vidal Blanc, among their wines at the event.

…and a Vidal Blanc, among their wines at the event.

Meanwhile, the Otto's Brew Pub beer trailer still draws significant attention from the contestants and guests.

Meanwhile, the Otto’s Brew Pub beer trailer still draws significant attention from the contestants and guests.

Last year the weather was unseasonably warm, early. hatches and blooms were all ahead of schedule. In early May, the day after Mother's Day last year,.the Green Drakes were hatching on Spruce Creek. This was way early by almost two weeks.

Last year the weather was unseasonably warm, early. Hatches and blooms were all well ahead of schedule. In early May, the day after Mother’s Day last year, the Green Drakes were hatching on Spruce Creek. This was way early for them by almost two weeks. There were enough duns hatching that some trout fed on them.

Joe Humphreys gives a nymph fishing demonstration.

Joe Humphreys gives a nymph fishing demonstration.

Attendees enjoy the evening dinner under the main tent.

Attendees prepare to enjoy the evening dinner under the main tent.

The entree - filet mignon, sea scallops, baked sweet potato,and asparagus.

The entree – filet mignon, sea scallops, baked sweet potato, and asparagus. All the food was excellent!

Apologies fopr the less-than-sharp image - dessert was the legendary sticky buns from the State College Diner, and vanilla ice cream.

Apologies for the less-than-sharp image – dessert was the legendary sticky buns from the State College Diner, and vanilla ice cream.

A bonus for my participation - I get to fish after dinner. Here's a brown about 19" - taken on a white crystal bugger.

A bonus for my participation – I get to fish after dinner. Here’s a brown about 19″ – taken on a white Krystal Bugger.

Another very nice brown on the white krystal bugger.

Another very nice brown on the white Krystal Bugger.

Of course, this report of this day can not end without the big-one-that-got-away story. After landing these two nice browns, I went downstream and hooked another nice trout, but lost that one when the hook pulled free. The next pool below that, I hooked a real hawg. I mean, this fish didn’t even move off the bottom. He just gave a heavy head-shaking and pull of serious weight, then after about ten seconds, my 3x tippet broke. I believe that trout was over two feet long.

I went to the beer trailer for one nightcap beverage and then headed back to my friend Paul’s for the night. His hospitality saves me from a drive of an hour-and-a-half.

The On The Fly Event is always looking for sponsors and contestants. Here is the web link with more information: http://www.ccysb.com/onthefly/

I’m leaving shortly to fish on Spring Creek above Bellefonte this afternoon and evening. Monday May 13th, I’ll be on Spruce Creek at the On The Fly Event. Hope you enjoyed this post! Thanks to all site visitors for your support of my blog!

Muddy Creek – Catch and Release Section

In York County, Pennsylvania, there is a Catch-and-Release, Fly Fishing Only Section on Muddy Creek. I fished it once previously with my friend Jack ten or twelve years ago. It’s got some pretty nice water. On my first visit there, the water was high and off-color, and I remember doing well catching lots of trout on my Gray Ghost Wooly Bugger. Last Friday, Jack and I headed up to Muddy Creek from his home in Bel Air, Maryland. There is an old abandoned railroad that served as a good easy access on my previous visit, but in the intervening years, it has grown up in most sections to the point that it is impassable. So one must walk along a winding footpath if one wants to fish the upper reaches of the project water.

I decided to fish drys, and that’s all I did from our start about 4:45 PM.

Muddy Creek, about a half-mile above the parking area at the lower end of the access area.

Muddy Creek, about a half-mile above the parking area at the lower end of the access area. This is where I started fishing. Nice pools and some good pockets.

Muddy Creek is stocked, but for the most part, the trout I caught were small, stream bred browns.

Downstream view

Downstream view of where I started fishing. The path is on the opposite side of the creek. I entered and crossed to the left-hand side of the creek just to the left of the boulders.

A few caddis flies were coming off, and I saw a handful of mayflies floating on the water. I did not catch one, but from a distance I think they were Hendricksons. I saw a few rises here and there. Most of the rising trout would end up taking a whack at my #12 Delaware Adams.

My first trout of the afternoon.

My first trout of the afternoon. He was all of five inches long, a stream bred fish, but made up for his diminutive size by his spunk, aggressive strike, and beautiful colors. The #12 Delaware Adams in his upper jaw is a big meal for this little fellow, but it’s barbless so removal and release was easy.

Another photo of the same trout.

Another photo of the same trout. The sunlight allows for better viewing and appreciation of the colors of the fish. Note the parr marks, a juvenile, probably a one-year old trout.

A little farther upstream.

A little farther upstream, looking downstream. Pools, runs, riffles, and pocket water.

Looking upstream at the lower end of a big pool.

Looking upstream at the lower end of a big pool. I did not get farther than the head of this pool, since around 7:00 PM, a few trout started rising sporadically.

After I caught my first trout, I wondered why I missed the next six fish that took my fly. I suddenly thought, “I better check my fly,” and sure enough, my tippet had tangled about the bend and I was pulling the fly backwards. Duh. Stay sharp, you’ll catch more trout.

Upstream view of the bog poolwhere I sopent the evening.

Upstream view from the big pool where I spent the evening. There are lots of large rocks along and in the stream. These make for very beautiful areas along the banks, and in the water, they provide cover and create pockets and holding lies.

Jack had walked above me, and was using three wet flies. I later found out that he caught a lot of trout, swinging them down and across. I admitted to Jack at the end of the evening that I would probably have caught more trout using wet flies or a bugger, but I just wanted to cast and fish dry flies.

By seven-thirty I started seeing some sulphur duns and a few spinners were gathering in the air. I had not brought a flashlight with me, and Jack and I were out of sight and had not communicated with one another since separating more than three hours earlier. I knew he would have to walk past me to return to the car. I was thinking that I should have brought my walkie-talkies along. I was going to wait for him until 8:00 PM, but I delayed my departure for a few more minutes. At exactly 8:05, the pool erupted with more than thirty rising trout. By this time I had switched to a #14 Sulphur Parachute Dun. I stood at the water’s edge at the lower end of a large, garage-sized boulder, and caught several more trout without entering the stream. Just as I released a trout and stood up, five feet away a large black shape boiled the surface and moved away from me underwater. At first I thought it was a gigantic carp, but then I ascertained it to be a beaver. I was startled enough by this event, and he didn’t even slap his tail.

Another stream bred brown

Another stream bred brown from Muddy Creek, taken on a #14 Sulphur Parachute Dun.

Close-up

Close-up of trout that ate my #14 Sulphur Parachute Dun

One more fish...

One more fish…the flash went off unexpectedly, but it sure highlights the sulphur orange body color of the fly I was using. This was my last fish, and then I had to get going.

Here is the recipe for this sulphur pattern,listed in order of tying the ingredients:

Sulphur Parachute Dun

Hook: Standard dry fly, #14

Thread: Danville Flymaster 6/0 Orange.

Wing: Tan colored Hi-Vis or Enrico’s Sea Fibers (same product, different name), set upright into a post

Tails: Six yellow or ginger Microfibetts, split 3/3 with tying thread

Abdomen: Superfine dubbing, Sulphur Orange. The abdomen is reverse wound, from thorax to tail, and ribbed with the tying thread going forward. This tightens up the body and adds segmentation. You ought to see the benefit of this technique on patterns where contrasting thread color is used.

Thorax: Sulphur orange rabbit dubbing

Hackle: Ginger

A thorax dun version of this same pattern can be made by winding the hackle conventionally. I prefer to clip the bottom of the hackle half-way between the point and shank. My sulphur pattern preference is to use the Super Floss stretch material in sulphur orange for the abdomen. See: https://donbastianwetflies.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/march-brown-spinners/

I ended up staying until almost 8:30 PM, hooking a dozen or so trout. Then I had to get out of there. Still no sign of Jack. I was in unfamiliar territory, with no flashlight, the path winds along the stream bank, with perilous (for waders) barbed wire at one section, my unseen companion, with previous heart-attack history, is seventy-five years old, and I was at least a half mile from the car. I was just a tad concerned. I started downstream, crossed over and found the path. I actually wondered, “What if Jack is not there?” Even so, I tried to believe everything would be OK. After I traveled a short ways, and since I was heading back home to Pennsylvania the next day, Saturday May 4th, I stopped and broke down my Loomis 4-piece rod to avoid tangling the rod in the brush along the path. I put the reel in my vest, and held the rod sections in hand. I had barely enough remaining daylight light to see the barbed wire, but I  managed to get past without snagging my waders, and then I finally arrived at the lower section where there is a cleared area by an old camper that probably serves as a weekend camp.

Fortunately, when I could see the parking area, I saw a light on where Jack had parked his car. As I got closer, I saw his standing silhouette at the back of the car, and he had already taken his waders off. He had somehow slipped past me, even though I vocalized “fish on” now and then. He was looking for me, and I still don’t know how he got by me, supposedly traveling along the creek, without seeing me. Anyway, he was fine and had enjoyed some good fishing.

We drove to his house where we had a late ten o’clock dinner of his home-made Maryland crabs cakes. No filler, they were great! The fishing and good meal were a nice conclusion to my visit. These photos will prolong the memories of a good trip.